the "young" behind young&foodish

 
I’m Daniel Young and I'm taking comfort food
beyond its comfort zone.
My mission is to seek out the best, from burgers to
bolognese, pizza to pastrami…
…and then challenge great chefs like Giorgio Locatelli
to do better at one of my one-off events.
My London pop-ups have starred Lionel Lévy, up from
Marseille for a one-night-only BurgerMonday…
Arcangelo Dandini, Rome's pope of pasta, on a rare visit
to London for a SpagWednesday….
and Nigella Lawson, serving her delectable cakes and putting the "tea" in CoffeeSaturday.
"Daniel Young is a café fan obsessed with comfort food.
Big attractions are his pop-up events."
– The Times
"Mondays-Saturdays foodies are flocking to eat a specific meal,
cooked by a different chef, in a new place."
– Evening Standard
"Daniel Young has curated a series of dining events that
have become the toast of the pop-up scene."
– Stylist
Come on in. Click on photo to join young&foodish now. http://youngandfoodish.com/membership

 
events

  • Danilo Cortellini was named Head Chef at the Italian Embassy in London for his work at a such Michelin-starred restaurants as San Domenico in Imola and Perbellini in Isola Rizza. But for SpagWednesday Danilo is drawing on earlier experiences in a less celebrated kitchen, his mother’s. His traditional menu twirls around an Abruzzo classic, Chitarra alla Teramana – a spaghetti-like fresh pasta with a ragu of pork, lamb & mini veal meatballs.

  • The great Adam Simmonds does BurgerMonday. Menu to be announced soon.

  • Tomer Amedi promises you a BurgerMonday like never and, for that matter, a burger like never before. If you know anything about The Palomar or its head chef you wouldn’t expect anything less.

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Top 5 Posts of 2014

top5collage 2

The Young&Foodish year ended on a high note, with my signing on with Phaidon, the prestigious publisher of books by Massimo BotturaFerran Adrià and René Redzepi, to compile a guide to the world’s best pizzerias.

This happy development should not come as too much of surprise if you’ve been following my posts here or on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. 2 of my top 5 posts of 2014 were about pizza. In the past year I posted 5 videos about Neapolitan pizza on my YouTube channel.

This preoccupation with pizza did not come at the expense of my burger obsession. Burgers, like pizza, claimed two slots among my top 5 posts of the year. Since early October I’ve working on a major Young&Foodish event for early 2015 that’s to be all about burgers – real burgers. The Real Burger Challenge launches in London on January 18th.

Best wishes to you for a Happy New Year and a deliciously foodish 2015.

 

Top Young&Foodish Posts of 2014

 

5. Why Pizza in Naples has to be Soft

Naples shared its love of pizza and dry pasta with the world many years ago but something got lost in translation. Rather than eat pasta al dente and pizza soft, in the Neapolitan way, foreigners learned to do the opposite.

Non-Italians at last discovered the pleasures of al dente pasta in the late 20th Century. But only recently have hardcore devotees in the pizza diaspora acquired a soft spot for pizza with a light, pliable crust.

In my video above the master pizzaiolo Enzo Coccia of Pizzaria La Notizia explains why Neapolitan pizza must be so soft and light.

READ MORE>>>
 

4. Meet the Burgers #LBBfinal

London Burger Bash Final – 6 April 2014
Jubilee Place at Borough Market
Fred's Bacon Cheeseburger
Piggy Rascal
Mangalitsa brioche bun, aged rib cap patty, Tallegio cheese, Mangalitsa belly bacon, confit pork shoulder, trotter & smoked pig dripping glaze, pickled cucumbers, smoked garlic mayo
Bleecker Black
beef, cheese, black pudding
Grizzly G&T
aged beef patty, wild sloe berry gin bacon jam, smoked bacon, smoked yuzu ketchup, American cheese, disco bun

 

3. Pizza Pilgrims Think out of Box & Into Pan

Pizza Pilgrims Frying Pan Pizza Pan
“I have something for you,” said Londoner James Elliot, one of the Pizza Pilgrims behind the pizza van and insanely popular pizzeria of that name. “I’d like to you take it home and test it.”

I assumed the white pizza box Elliot handed me contained a pizza, albeit a rather heavy one. But when I opened the lid I saw a chemistry set where the pizza ought to have been. Plastic containers containing various elements were slotted into the round openings in a square sheet of green cardboard.
I slid the box over to Elliot for an explanation of its contents. The printed text under the lid contained the step-by-step instructions (see their recipe) for the Pizza Pilgrims Neapolitan Frying Pan Pizza.

READ MORE>>>
 

2. My Salad Cream Days in the UK

SONY DSCAssimilating the young and foodish me into British life has proven more frustrating than expected. I assumed it would be easy for me to adapt to the London foodscape, given I was educated in New Yorkese, a language with vast similarities to English, and was already acquainted with orange marmalade.

Turns out there was more to mastering the British food curriculum than distinguishing crisps from chips, aubergines from eggplants, tomatoes from tomatoes. 10 years into my London education I discovered I hadn’t even heard of, much less tried, a beloved British condiment, Heinz Salad Cream.

READ MORE>>>
 

1. Bleecker Street Triumphs with Blood & Guts at London Burger Bash Final

bleecker black cut-throughphoto by Ian Sargent

Zan Kaufman of Bleecker St Burger won the Final of the London Burger Bash on April 5th at Borough Market with a combination of blood and guts.

The blood refers not to the oozy redness of her aged beef patties, cooked south of medium rare, but to the dried blood in the Clonakilty beef black pudding she added to her #LBBfinal entry – the Bleecker Black.


The guts alludes not to any beef innards in that Irish black pudding, however essential they may be, but rather to the audacity of using an ingredient that could repulse a thick slice of the voting pool.

READ MORE>>>

The Pleasure of “Semplice: Real Italian food” is half good ingredients & half Dino Joannides

semplice“As with any recipe,” writes Dino Joannides in his headnote introducing Spaghetti with Tomato and Basil, “success lies 75 percent in good-quality ingredients and 25 percent in execution.”

The maths may be problematic, leaving no room to credit the know-how, clarity and passion Dino puts into his recipes, but the point is clear: In Semplice: Real Italian Food, Dino’s newly published labour of love, ingredients come first. For Italians good food is made with good foods, it’s as simple as that.

But what are these good-quality ingredients? Who are the best producers? Where do you find them? It’s Dino’s informed answers to these questions that distinguish his work. Although I own some 35 books on Italian food Semplice nevertheless fills a big gap on my cookbook shelf. READ MORE >>

My Salad Cream Days in the UK

SONY DSC

Assimilating the young and foodish me into British life has proven more frustrating than expected. I assumed it would be easy for me to adapt to the London foodscape, given I was educated in New Yorkese, a language with vast similarities to English, and was already acquainted with orange marmalade.

Turns out there was more to mastering the British food curriculum than distinguishing crisps from chips, aubergines from eggplants, tomatoes from tomatoes. 10 years into my London education I discovered I hadn’t even heard of, much less tried, a beloved British condiment, Heinz Salad Cream. READ MORE >>